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Recipes

Recipes

Cranberry Nut Dressing

Gingery Carrots

Julie's Raw Saurerkraut

Lemon Power Balls

Mexican Corn Bread Pizza

Mock Mac and Cheese

Shepherd's Pie

Julie's Raw Saurerkraut

 

from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD.

Fermented, or cultured, foods are incredibly good for the gut. In addition to being a natural way to replenish our beneficial gut flora, culturing can enhance the flavor of foods and make them last longer. Some fermentation processes increase the amount of protein, essential amino acids, fatty acids, and vitamins in foods. Because they repopulate the gut with all the “good bugs,” cultured foods are a wonderful addition for children on yeast-free diets. Julie Matthews swears by this recipe, and was good enough to share it. You may think that your children will not eat this, but Julie swears they will, so try it! Do not be scared by all the steps—it is an easy thing to do, and you can even watch a video demonstration at Julie’s website, Nourishinghope.com. It does not get much easier than that!

Ingredients:
5 pounds cabbage (green or red/purple)
3 tablespoons sea salt
Directions:
1) Rinse cabbage. Retain 2 outer cabbage leaves. Grate cabbage by hand with a mandolin or in food processor, finely or coarsely. 
2) Place cabbage in bowl. Sprinkle salt on cabbage as you go. The salt pulls water out of cabbage and creates brine so it can ferment and sour without rotting. The salt also keeps cabbage crunchy by inhibiting organisms and enzymes that soften it.
3) You can add other vegetables such as carrots, ginger, radishes, onions, garlic, leafy greens, seaweed, beets, turnips, and burdock roots. For consistent results, use a majority of cabbage (75%) with some of these other vegetables for flavor and variety.
4) Mix ingredients and pack into crock. Pack a small amount into crock, a little at a time, and tamp it down with your fist or a kitchen implement like a potato masher. The goal is to force water out of cabbage, pack kraut tightly, and press out any air. 
5) Place cabbage leaves in crock on top of packed cabbage to keep any shredded cabbage from floating to surface of water. Place plate over leaves to keep everything down. Add a weighted jar (filled with water works) on top to act as a weight. The goal is to keep everything (except jar) under water. The water is formed by liquid in cabbage and salt. Let it sit for 6 hours or so, and see if water line rises above cabbage. If there is not 11⁄2" water, add saltwater in the ratio of 1 tablespoon salt to 1 cup water. Salt inhibits mold growth, but too much salt slows 
good bacteria. As such, you want to be fairly accurate with your salt-to-cabbage and salt-to-water proportions.
6) Cover with fabric cloth, and tie with a string or large rubber band. Make sure it goes all the way around, so no bugs can get in. 
7) Ferment for 2–8 weeks. Sauerkraut is done when it is sour, crunchy, and not 
salty tasting.

Gingery Carrots

from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD.

Carrots are so sweet that many children like them (if you can get them to try). This recipe really brings out the natural sweetness of carrots.
Ingredients:
11⁄2 pounds carrots, peeled and grated
1 tablespoon cider vinegar 
3 tablespoons water
1 teaspoon fresh ginger, grated
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1 tablespoon olive oil
Dash nutmeg (use fresh if possible)
Salt and pepper (to taste)
Directions:
1) Preheat oven to 350°F.
2) Place carrots in greased ovenproof casserole. 
3) Whisk vinegar, water, ginger, and cinnamon, and stir mixture into carrots. 
4) Drizzle with oil, and add salt and pepper. 
5) Cover casserole and bake for 40 minutes.
Makes 4–6 servings

Shepherd's Pie

from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD.

Shepherd’s pie has always been a family favorite around our house. It is really easy to make if you use frozen vegetables (which are quick and also retain their nutrients). If you are always in a hurry, here is a trick to remember: Browned ground meat freezes very well for later use. Be sure to drain the fat and let it cool completely before bagging and freezing. Then pull out what you need and throw the meat in your pot or casserole. It works perfectly for this recipe, and makes it a quick meal to put together.

Ingredients:
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 onion, chopped finely
1 garlic clove, minced
1 pound lean ground meat
1 (1-pound) package mixed frozen vegetables
1 cup GF salsa
4 cups mashed potatoes*
Salt and pepper (to taste)
Directions:
1) Preheat oven to 350oF.
2) Heat oil in a skillet, then cook onion and garlic until soft.
3) Add meat and continue cooking over medium heat, until meat is cooked through.
4) Add vegetables and return the skillet to boiling.
5) Add salsa and cook for an additional 10 minutes.
6) Season with salt and pepper, then pour mixture into a casserole. Top with mashed potatoes.
7) Bake casserole for 35–40 minutes, until top is golden and meat is bubbling.
Makes 4–6 servings
*It is fine to use instant mashed potatoes if you are sure they do not contain additives or preservatives. Barbara’s Potatoes are a good choice, and can be made with broth or a dairy substitute of your choice.

 

Cranberry Nut Dressing

from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD.

"I adore cranberries. Every November, when they first make their appearance in the grocery store, I buy enough to last the year. They freeze very well, and I love to throw them into applesauce and other dishes. I also like dried cranberries, which used to be hard to find but now are widely available. This recipe uses dried cranberries and nuts, and is a really nice change of pace."

Cranberry Nut Dressing
Ingredients:
1⁄2 cup celery, chopped
1⁄2 cup onion, chopped
1⁄4 cup CF margarine
1⁄2 teaspoon dried thyme
1⁄2 teaspoon dried marjoram
Salt and pepper (to taste)
6 cups bread (preferably GF English Muffins), cubed and toasted lightly
1⁄2 cup dried cranberries
1⁄2 cup nuts, chopped (preferably pecans or hazelnuts)
1⁄2 cup GF chicken broth
Directions:

1. Preheat oven to 325oF.
2. Sauté celery and onion in margarine, and remove from heat when tender.          Add herbs, salt, and pepper.
3. Place bread cubes in a mixing bowl, and add celery mixture, cranberries,            and nuts. Use enough broth to moisten well.
4. Bake mixture in a covered casserole for 30–45
Makes 4-6 Servings

Lemon Power Balls
from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD. Enjoy

If desired, you can add 1–2 teaspoons of calcium powder to the mixture. The
sesame seeds add calcium.
Ingredients:
1 cup pitted dates, chopped
1 cup walnuts, chopped
3⁄4 cup white sesame seeds
1⁄4 cup fresh lemon juice
Grated zest from 2 lemons
1⁄2 cup unsweetened coconut flakes (optional)
Directions:

1. Process all ingredients (except coconut) in a blender or food processor.
2. Because this is a slightly sticky mixture, wet your hands first. Then, roll mixture into balls. If desired, roll balls in coconut.
3. Store in refrigerator.
Makes 6–8 servings

Mexican Corn Bread Pizza

from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD.

This is a simple recipe that is easy to throw together. If your child cannot tolerate corn, you can substitute Cream of Rice cereal for cornmeal in this recipe. 
Ingredients:
1 recipe corn bread 
(see below)**
1 pound ground beef
1 onion, chopped
1 teaspoon chili powder
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1⁄4 cup salsa
Salt and pepper (to taste)
1 (8-ounce) package Daiya shredded, cheddar-style cheese, divided 

Directions:
1) Preheat oven to 400oF.
2) Prepare corn bread and spread batter in a greased 12-inch pizza pan.
3) Bake cornbread for 8–10 minutes, or until lightly brown. 
4) Brown meat and onion in a pan, and then drain. Set aside.
5) Add seasoning to salsa and spoon over cornbread crust.
6) Sprinkle 1 cup “cheese” over baked crust.
7) Top with meat mixture and remaining cheese. 
8) Bake cornbread pizza for 4–5 minutes, or until cheese is melted.
Makes 4–6 servings

**"Special Diets" Sweet Corn Bread Batter Recipe
3⁄4 cup sugar
1⁄2 cup oil
2 eggs, lightly beaten
11⁄2 cups GF flour blend (Hagman mix or soft rice flour)
11⁄2 cups yellow cornmeal
1 tablespoon GF baking powder
1 teaspoon xanthan gum
1⁄8 teaspoon salt
1 cup milk substitute

Mock Mac and Cheese

from "Special Diets for Special Kids" by by Lisa Lewis, PhD.

"I have never met a child who does not like macaroni and cheese. Unfortunately, both the wheat macaroni and the cheese sauce are forbidden for our kids. Daiya now makes a great cheese substitute, and there are several excellent GF pastas available (e.g., Tinkayada brand). The white sauce (béchamel) used in this recipe can also serve as the base for any creamed casserole or soup."

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons CF margarine
2 tablespoons sweet rice flour
1 cup milk substitute (soy or potato is preferable)
Salt and pepper (to taste)
1⁄2 pound GF macaroni
Water
1 onion, diced
1⁄2 (8-ounce) package Daiya cheddar-style cheese
2–3 dashes GF Worcestershire sauce (optional)
1 tablespoon CF margarine

Directions:
1) Preheat oven to 350oF.
2) To make a white sauce, melt margarine in a small saucepan.
3) Add flour and blend into a paste. Add milk substitute very gradually, stirring        constantly.
4) Continue stirring, add salt, and cook over medium heat until the sauce is            smooth and thickened. Set aside.
5) Cook macaroni al dente in a pot with water according to package directions.      Drain, rinse, and drain again. 
6) Place cooked noodles in a small, ovenproof casserole.
7) Stir in onion, Worcestershire sauce, white sauce, salt, and pepper into                noodles. Mix well and dot with CF margarine.
8) Bake for 20–30 minutes.
9) If desired, top with crumbled potato chips, extra grated Daiya, or GF                  breading mix (into which a little melted CF margarine has been added).
Makes 4–6 servings.

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